Jul 26, 2014
qualx asked: can i ask u library questions? i'm going to ask u questions about library etiquette. now that i don't have job i need to get out every day cause i fall into really bad habits when i stay in every day. library seems like a healthy place and not starbucks. what can i do to make life easier for librarians? are there things regulars do that are unintentionally annoying or troublesome for others? should i avoid using quiet study rooms as an alone person? i don't wanna be that guy that sucks. thank!!

rgr-pop:

  1. as long as you are not hassling/talking too much at/oogling the librarians or making a mess, do not worry about the needs of the librarians!! library staff should never ever make patronage feel like a hassle unless they are…being actually rude or not following code of conduct. if you DO want to make life easier for library staff, always remember what they tell you and do what they say and learn to use the system as much as you can yourself (to whatever degree that is) so you don’t rely on them. also read the code of conduct so you know. but the MOST IMPORTANT THING about public libraries is your use of the space and you shouldn’t have to feel guilty about just being there.
  2. yeah i’ll say it again, the most important thing about public libraries is that they are public space where people can be.
  3. that being said, it is good to think about the needs of other patrons. does your use of study rooms hog the study rooms for other people? how busy/well-furnished is your library? that’s the only thing that I think is really important
  4. honestly “i want to sit quietly in the library all day” is the ideal patron, it really is
  5. don’t talk on your phone
  6. clean up after yourself
  7. don’t try to do library staff’s work for them, that’s annoying
  8. don’t flirt with anybody either i mean i’m not saying you would but don’t. there’s no flirting in libraries.
  9. please no weed in library either :(
  10. pack up before the absolute last minute, i guess that’s one thing i can say for sure with much experience would make the lives of staff much better
  11. never be that person who reaches across the desk to put your own card under the barcode scanner. they are the UNIVERSAL MOST HATED.
  12. a lot of library staff are actually underpaid bitter jerks who don’t like helping people because they hate their lives and they hate poor people. this is the truest thing. if they are rude to you or seem annoyed with you it’s not always gonna be your fault.

is this helpful at all? just think about making sure you’re not hogging resources for other patrons if those resources are scarce (maybe like, power outlets, for example), do not make space hard to navigate for others (like stretching your cord across aisles and shit)

basically public transit rules tbh

but you have a right to be there and it EXISTS so you can be there and not feel bad about it

Ex-librarian here and I concur with all points.

In my experience the best patrons were the one who were the most worried about simply existing in the library. Please! They are for existing in. Please enjoy sitting quietly, looking at the local history exhibits or art or fish or whatever your library has on display, looking through books, letting the staff shelve your materials, etc.

Jul 26, 2014
hopeofyesterday:

jimllpaintit:

Awkward Star Trek orgyAs requested by Sam Wise 

Riker…what what what are you doing

hopeofyesterday:

jimllpaintit:

Awkward Star Trek orgy

As requested by Sam Wise

Riker…what what what are you doing

(via strontiumlullaby)

Jul 26, 2014

Salome dances her dance of the seven veils,
The men all eye her like wolves on the hunt, this beautiful girl
finally undressing for them. Finally they can see her
exactly as they want to.
The first veil drops.

In 2007, Kim Kardashian’s ex-boyfriend
released their sex tape against her will.
Kim Kardashian, rather than hide in shame
Used the publicity to promote her own career.

Salome moves like a dream half-remembered.
Salome dances like a siren song. All the men ache
to see the hot sugar of her hip bones.
The second veil drops.

In 2014, Kim Kardashian walks down the aisle
As the whole world watches. If only all of us
were so successful in our revenge.
If only all of us stood in our Louboutin heels
on the backs of the men who betray us,
surveying the world we created for ourselves.

The third veil drops.

Kim Kardashian knows exactly what you think of her.
She presses the cloth tighter against her skin
Her smile is a promise she never intends to keep

We can almost see all of her.
Salome shows us her body
but never her eyes.
The fourth veil is dropping.

The four things most recently tweeted at Kim Kardashian were
@KimKardashian Suck My Dick
@Kim Kardashian Can I Meet Kanye?
@KimKardashian Please Fuck Me
@KimKardashian I Love You. I Love You.

Women are told to keep their legs shut.
Women are told to keep their mouths shut.
Some women are kept silent for so long,
They become experts in the silent theft of power.
The fifth veil has dropped.

Kim Kardashian made $12 million dollars this year
Yesterday, uncountable men in their miserable jobs,
told their miserable friends that Kim was a “dumb whore”
Kim Kardashian will never learn their names.

The sixth veil has dropped.
The seventh veil has dropped.

And Salome sat beside King Herod. And he swore unto her
“Whatsoever thou shalt ask of me, I will give to thee
unto the half of my kingdom”
And she smiled, and said
“Bring me the head of John The Baptist.
Punish the man who hurt me”

Clementine von Radics (via clementinevonradics)

(via neelytherese)

Jul 26, 2014

Color, Chromophobia, and Colonialism: Some Historical Thoughts

hemipelagicdredger:

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

I came across a very interesting article recently in regard to western society and the use of color, which explores colonial history and historical context.

But consider this: in the things that we make or buy, color tends to be reined in. While there are some rule-breakers out there, generally speaking, we think that bright colors are acceptable in limited doses, but too much vivid color can seem like an assault on the senses, or we just dismiss it as tacky.

For instance, it would be considered fashionable to wear a bright pink tie, so long as the suit is gray, but in general, we would find it eccentric or odd to wear a bright pink suit with a gray tie. And in terms of home decor, we’ve had plenty of heated debates about how tacky or inconsiderate it is to paint one’s home in a “loud” color, and it’s been reported that the most popular color for home exteriors is white.

Chromophobia is marked, not just by the desire to eradicate color, but also to control and to master its forces. When we do use color, there’s some sense that it needs to be controlled; that there are rules to its use, either in terms of its quantity or its symbolic applications (e.g., don’t paint your dining room blue because it suppresses appetite). Please note that I’m not arguing against color psychology; it’s undeniable that certain colors carry certain cultural assumptions and associations, a fact that has led anthropologist Michael Taussig to argue that color should be considered a manifestation of the sacred.

But what I am arguing is that there is a pervasive idea that color gets us in the gut: it’s seductive, emotional, compelling. Color, in the words of nineteenth-century art theorist Charles Blanc, often “turns the mind from its course, changes the sentiment, swallows the thought.”

According to some art critics, sensory anthropologists, and historians, this mutual attraction and repulsion to color has centuries-old roots, bound up in a colonial past and fears of the unknown.

Michael Taussig has recounted that from the seventeenth century, the British East India Company centered much of its trade on brightly colored, cheap, and dye-fast cotton textiles imported from India. Because of the Calico Acts of 1700 and 1720, which supported the interests of the wool and silk weaving guilds, these textiles could only be imported into England with the proviso that they were destined for export again, generally to the English colonies in the Caribbean or Africa.

These vibrant textiles played a key part in the African trade, and especially in the African slave trade, where British traders would use the textiles to purchase slaves. According to Michael Taussig, these trades are significant not only because they linked chromophilic areas like India and Africa, but also because “color achieved greater conquests than European-instigated violence during the preceding four centuries of the slave trade. The first European slavers, the Portuguese in the fifteenth century, quickly learned that to get slaves they had to trade for slaves with African chiefs and kings, not kidnap them, and they conducted this trade with colored fabrics in lieu of violence.” Ironically, many of these slaves were then put to work in the colonies cultivating plants like indigo, that yielded dyes whose monetary values sometimes surpassed that of sugar.

In England, contemporaries often called the Indian textiles “rags” or “trash” and scorned their bright colors, and in Europe more generally, bright colors were taken as a sign of degeneracy and inferiority. The German writer Goethe famously stated that “Men in a state of nature, uncivilized nations and children, have a great fondness for colors in their utmost brightness,” whereas “people of refinement” avoid vivid colors (or what he called “pathological colors”).

In short, a love of bright color marked one as uncivilized, as not possessing taste, as being “foreign” or other. Color represented the “mythical savage state out of which civilization, the nobility of the human spirit, slowly, heroically, has lifted itself — but back into which it could always slide” (Batchelor, 23).

This danger of descent, of falling into degeneracy, disorientation, and excess, resulted in a valorization of the “generalized white” mentioned above. According to Batchelor, prejudice against color “masks a fear: a fear of contamination and corruption by something that is unknown or appears unknowable,” and the highly minimal, white spaces of contemporary architecture mark an attempt to rationalize and strictly limit an interior, to stop its merging with the world outside.

The “hollow, whited chamber, scraped clean, cleared of any evidence of the grotesque embarrassments of an actual life. No smells, no noises, no colour; no changing from one state to another and the uncertainty that comes with it.”

Read More

You can also read subsequent conversations on this topic at medievalpoc here

Gonna go ahead and reblog this because this was a cool-as-fuck discussion.

Jul 22, 2014

likeafieldmouse:

Jordi Huisman - Rear Window (2010)

(via eldritchbitch)

Jul 20, 2014

foxmouth:

Landscape Portraits, 2013 | Anna Ådén

(via blood-head)

Jul 20, 2014
adsertoris:

Sigourney Weaver and the Alien Queen on the set of Aliens (1986)

adsertoris:

Sigourney Weaver and the Alien Queen on the set of Aliens (1986)

(Source: chezalp, via officialkylieminoguedragqueen)

Jul 19, 2014
hemipelagicdredger:

bobthemole:

jadelennox:

aspartaimee:

besttitlesever:

Fish Stick Report, Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, 1957
SuDoc Call No: I 49.8/2:1957 
Early data visualizations of fish stick statistics.  Fishsticktistics?
Submitted by Marie Concannon via CGray
Find it in a Library

so this is a thing that was.

Every govdoc should be replaced with the Fish Stick Report.

The Invention of Fish Sticks is one of my favorite History of Random Science stories. If you have academic access, look up this paper:
The Ocean’s Hot Dog: The Development of the Fish Stick
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/tech/summary/v049/49.1josephson.html

I love you Bob

hemipelagicdredger:

bobthemole:

jadelennox:

aspartaimee:

besttitlesever:

Fish Stick Report, Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, 1957

SuDoc Call No: I 49.8/2:1957 

Early data visualizations of fish stick statistics.  Fishsticktistics?

Submitted by Marie Concannon via CGray

Find it in a Library

so this is a thing that was.

Every govdoc should be replaced with the Fish Stick Report.

The Invention of Fish Sticks is one of my favorite History of Random Science stories. If you have academic access, look up this paper:

The Ocean’s Hot Dog: The Development of the Fish Stick

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/tech/summary/v049/49.1josephson.html

I love you Bob

Jul 18, 2014
arsvitaest:

Harry Willson Watrous (1857-1940), Twilight, oil on panel

arsvitaest:

Harry Willson Watrous (1857-1940), Twilight, oil on panel

(via officialkylieminoguedragqueen)

Jul 8, 2014
Navigate
« To the past Page 1 of 58
About